Foot rot in sheep

Although there are many reasons as to why sheep develop hoof problems, foot rot is certainly the foulest of all. A highly contagious bacterium, Dichelobacter nodosus, is responsible for these infections. If an animal has soft hooves due to moisture or has sores on its hooves and on the tissue surrounding the hooves due to…

Biosecurity: Keeping out the ‘black’ sheep

Things could be so much easier if sick or infected animals turned black to be easily identifiable but, alas, no such luck. Biosecurity is a frequently discussed topic, especially in the COVID-19 pandemic era, but somehow we still struggle to completely understand it … or are we just choosing to ignore the advantages of implementing…

Acidosis and adaptation in sheep

Grain poisoning is commonly seen in sheep after consuming large quantities of grains that they have not been appropriately adapted to. This type of poisoning is the result of ruminal acidosis. Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) may occur when livestock eat rations high in starch and low in fibre. The microbes in the rumen rapidly ferment…